Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 17th International Conference on Industrial Chemistry and Water Treatment New York, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Tamaki Nakano photo
Biography:

Tamaki Nakano received his BSc (1986), MSc (1988), and PhD (1991) degrees from Osaka University, Japan. He joined Nagoya University as an Assistant Professor (Prof. Yoshio Okamoto’s group) in 1990 and was promoted to an Associate Professor in 1998. During his appointment at Nagoya University, he also served as a visiting scientist at Cornell University (host: Prof. DotseviY. Sogah, 1993–1994). In 1999, hemoved to Nara Institute of Science and Technology (NAIST) as an Associate Professor. He was appointed as a Professor of Hokkaido University in 2006 and is currently supervising his research group in Institute for Catalysis.     
 

Abstract:

Interactions between substances and light play important roles in life. One of the most important aspects is photosynthesis by plants and other organisms. In photosynthesis, sugars and molecular oxygen are produced from carbon dioxide and water where photon energy drives the reaction. Moreover, in artificial chemical synthesis, light promotes various reactions that are not driven by thermal energy. Further, in reactions where chiral compounds are produced, non-racemic products can be obtained using circularly polarized light (CPL). We recently reported that a preferred-handed helical conformation is induced for a linear polyfluorene derivative (poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl [PDOF]) in the solid state when the polymer is irradiated with CPL  [1,2]. The mechanism of this chirality induction involves a twisted-coplanar transition (TCT) of an aromatic–aromatic junction in the polymer where one of the enantiomeric, right- and left-handed twists is preferentially excited into the coplanar conformation. TCT through photo excitation was first predicted for biphenyl through theoretical calculations [4].

In the CPL-driven helix formation of the linear polyfluorene derivative, strong inter-chain interactions were important in effectively induce chirality, which in turn implicates that polymers with weak inter-chain interactions cannot be subjected to the CPL method.  This point of the CPL method was overcome using aid molecules which reinforce or simulate inter-chain interaction; a star-shaped fluorene oligomer having only weak inter-chain interactions was successfully made optically active [3].  In addition, photo-transformation of 1,10-bi(2-naphthol) (BINOL) was studied

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Manuel Alvarez Cuenca photo
Biography:

Dr. Alvarez Cuenca is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Water Technologies Laboratory at Ryerson University (Toronto, Canada). He holds a B.Eng (Chemical Engineering) from the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, and an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Physics and Chemical Engineering respectively from the University of Western Ontario (Canada). Manuel adds to his curriculum over 15 years of industrial experience with multinational corporations in the areas of fluidized bed reactors, bioreactor design, water treatment and clean power generation. In 2002, he founded Ecotechnos Inc., a company devoted to the design and construction of advanced bioreactors for the treatment of industrial watewater including nitrogen and phosphorous removal. He is an active consultant for both, governments and the private sector in Canada, Spain and Iberoamerica in the areas of water treatment, and energy. His academic record spans over three decades with universities in Europe, Canada, and South America, including Ryerson University, U. of Western Ontario, U of Waterloo, U. of Guelph, U of Windsor, U.Politécnica de Madrid ( Spain), Universidad Nacional de Colombia (Colombia), U de Cartagena de Indias (Colombia), Corporacion Universitaria de la Costa (Colombia).

E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]

Abstract:

The availability of water quality and quantity are facing an unprecedented crisis created by explosive demographic growth and overuse. Hence urban and industrial scarcity, limited construction surface and increasing chemical complexity of contaminants, like nutrients, microplastics, endocrine disruptors, etc. Contaminated water is defined here as water not suited for direct human consumption or industrial utilization whose composition has deleterious effects on either human health or the environment. The recovery of water for human utilization presents an unprecedented challenge. That recovery demands effective reactors, of reduced power consumption, demanding little construction surface for retrofitting and refurbishing.

Historical records show that contaminated water has been treated to achieve potability for thousands of years. The treatment was only physical (sand filtration) but in more recent times contaminated water has been treated chemically and biologically, or the physical treatment has become more complex.

Planar bioreactors (Often called aeration tanks) of circular or rectangular cross section have been the first choice for water engineers. Furthermore, in the last few decades, the kinetics of the processes, the control and instrumentation, and the reactor design of the biochemical reactors involved have become more precise and sophisticated.

The purpose of this presentation is to describe the STAR process including the application of the Multistage Vertical Bioreactor (USA Patent 8,585,900 B2) to the elimination of nutrients in contaminated water.
 

This bioreactor developed in the Department of Chemical Engineering of Ryerson University (Canada), offers powerful features associated to its performance removal, construction materials, reduced planar construction space, geometry and modular configuration. The simultaneous removal of both ammonia and total phosphorous exceeds 93 % for each contaminant. Two abundant microbial groups Saprospirasae (unidentified species) and Zoogloea are responsible for the simultaneous removal of ammonia and total phosphorous in the process
 

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Manuel Alvarez Cuenca photo
Biography:

Dr. Alvarez Cuenca is a Professor of Chemical Engineering and Director of the Water Technologies Laboratory at Ryerson University (Toronto, Canada). He holds a B.Eng (Chemical Engineering) from the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, and an M.Sc. and a Ph.D. in Physics and Chemical Engineering respectively from the University of Western Ontario (Canada). Manuel adds to his curriculum over 15 years of industrial experience with multinational corporations in the areas of fluidized bed reactors, bioreactor design, water treatment and clean power generation. In 2002, he founded Ecotechnos Inc., a company devoted to the design and construction of advanced bioreactors for the treatment of industrial watewater including nitrogen and phosphorous removal. He is an active consultant for both, governments and the private sector in Canada, Spain and Iberoamerica in the areas of water treatment, and energy. His academic record spans over three decades with universities in Europe, Canada, and South America, including Ryerson University, U. of Western Ontario, U of Waterloo, U. of Guelph, U of Windsor, U.Politécnica de Madrid ( Spain), Universidad Nacional de Colombia (Colombia), U de Cartagena de Indias (Colombia), Corporacion Universitaria de la Costa (Colombia).

E-mail: [email protected], [email protected]

Abstract:

The availability of water quality and quantity are facing an unprecedented crisis created by explosive demographic growth and overuse. Hence urban and industrial scarcity, limited construction surface and increasing chemical complexity of contaminants, like nutrients, microplastics, endocrine disruptors, etc. Contaminated water is defined here as water not suited for direct human consumption or industrial utilization whose composition has deleterious effects on either human health or the environment. The recovery of water for human utilization presents an unprecedented challenge. That recovery demands effective reactors, of reduced power consumption, demanding little construction surface for retrofitting and refurbishing.

Historical records show that contaminated water has been treated to achieve potability for thousands of years. The treatment was only physical (sand filtration) but in more recent times contaminated water has been treated chemically and biologically, or the physical treatment has become more complex.

Planar bioreactors (Often called aeration tanks) of circular or rectangular cross section have been the first choice for water engineers. Furthermore, in the last few decades, the kinetics of the processes, the control and instrumentation, and the reactor design of the biochemical reactors involved have become more precise and sophisticated.

The purpose of this presentation is to describe the STAR process including the application of the Multistage Vertical Bioreactor (USA Patent 8,585,900 B2) to the elimination of nutrients in contaminated water.
 

This bioreactor developed in the Department of Chemical Engineering of Ryerson University (Canada), offers powerful features associated to its performance removal, construction materials, reduced planar construction space, geometry and modular configuration. The simultaneous removal of both ammonia and total phosphorous exceeds 93 % for each contaminant. Two abundant microbial groups Saprospirasae (unidentified species) and Zoogloea are responsible for the simultaneous removal of ammonia and total phosphorous in the process
 

Keynote Forum

Hussam Jouhara

Brunel University London
United Kingdom

Keynote: Pyrolysis of domestic based feedstock up to 300°C and applications of its products

Time : 11:40-12:10

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hussam Jouhara photo
Biography:

Prof. Hussam Jouhara is an associate professor in Brunel University London. Since obtaining his PhD from Manchester University in 2004. He has unique expertise in working on applied heat exchangers and energy-related research activities with direct support from research councils and various UK and international industrial partners. He has extensive expertise in designing and manufacturing various types of heat exchangers, including heat pipes and heat pipe-based heat exchangers for low, medium and high temperature applications. His work in the field of heat pipe based heat exchangers resulted in novel designs for recouperators, steam generators & condensers and flat heat pipes. These have been implemented across various industries including, but not limited to: food, electronics thermal management and low to high industrial waste heat recovery and Energy from Waste. Over the last few years, he has successfully managed to achieve new designs for industrial waste heat recovery and many thermal systems that have enhanced the performance of various industrials processes in the UK, Europe and world-wide. His latest invention relates to a new Waste to Energy system that converts municipal waste to fuel that can be used to heat our homes. The new system was developed in collaboration with Manik Venture and Mission Resources and is called: Home Energy Recovery Unit (HERU). Details about this system can be found in: www.myheru.com.

Abstract:

The Global discarding of resources is increasing at an alarming rate. Current technology is available to treat a variety of these resources. However, the majority of waste conversion methods are economically unviable on large scale and have many complications.

Pyrolysis is commonly operated at high temperature in order to thermally degrade feedstock into syngas, bio-oil and biochar. High temperature pyrolysis has a high cost and danger aspects to operate at a domestic level. Therefore, low temperature pyrolysis offers a thermal degradation mechanism, whereby it costs less and produces high value products. The chemical characteristics of the bio-oil formed from low temperature pyrolysis are similar to that of diesel and gasoline. Chemical reformation may be needed to ensure the bio-oil properties are appropriate for the intended use. The syngas produced consists of light hydrocarbon chains as well as CO2 and CO. The biochar formed has desirable characteristics for it to be used as a water filter. These characteristics include a wide pore size distribution, high adsorption capacity and no toxic compounds, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons PAHs, being formed. All of the different product phases formed contain high heating values, enabling them to be used as fuel resources. These products can also be used as chemical feedstock for various chemical processes. Low temperature pyrolysis offers an alternative method to dispose of discarded household materials and recover valuable chemicals. The advantages of such process are low cost and the least environmental impact and a wide range of applications of its products.

 

Keynote Forum

Geraldo Balieiro Neto

Sao Paulo State Government
Brazil

Keynote: Effects of magnetic treated water on rats and cows hemogasometry

Time : 12:20-12:50

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Geraldo Balieiro Neto photo
Biography:

Geraldo Balieiro Neto has completed his PhD from São Paulo State University and Postdoctoral studies from University of Evora. He is a Scientific Researcher in full dedication to research (40h) and a Research Director from São Paulo State Government, in Department of Agriculture and Food Supply, São Paulo Agency for Agribusiness Technology (APTA), since Jun 13, 2005. He has published more than 27 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

 

Abstract:

The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of magnetic water on blood gas level of rats and cows. Twenty six jersey cows and forty-eight wistar rats were divided into two groups: control (cows=13, rats=24), drinking regular water and the group test, drinking magnetic water-treated (cows=13, rats=24). A completely randomized design was used. Blood samples were collected from caudal auricular artery in cows and from femoral artery in rats. The water treatment was performed using a commercial magnetic conditioner (Sylocimol) designed to generate a strong magnetic monopole field of 3,860 Gauss. These devices were inserted into the water troughs. No significant difference was found in the water intake between the groups. The SO2 (91.75% vs 94.60%) was higher and levels of CHCO3 (28.66 vs 25.04mmHg) and pCO2 (53.85 vs 46.40mmHg) showed unusual reductions with the same pH and anion gap in the arterial blood of the rats drinking the magnetic water-treated and there was no difference in blood pH (7.32 vs 7.31), because of the systemic acid-base balance. On the other hand no significant difference was found on CHCO3 (26.17 vs 25.87mmHg) and SO2 (98.4% vs 98.3%) however higher pH (7.44 vs 7.40, p<0.05) and lower pCO2 (37.97 vs 42.47mmHg, p<0.05) were found in arterial blood of cows drinking magnetic-treated water compared to control group. These effects were attributed due reduced metabolism in kidney to bicarbonate buffer production. The consumption of water treated by magnetic field provided an effective way to decreased metabolic acidosis.

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Pérez-Nava Jessica photo
Biography:

Pérez-Nava J has completed her MSc from Benémerita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. Currently, she is pursuing the Doctoral program in the same university. Her research areas include: photochemical treatment of wastewater, genotoxicity and microbiological tests. She has published two scientific papers and has made academics mobilities in Mexico and abroad.

Abstract:

Population growth, industrial development, intensified agricultural production and the number of contaminants incorporated into the environment have deteriorated the water compartments, it is necessary to develop strategies to reduce and prevent their contamination. In some types of wastewater, products resulting from the biological treatment process (non-biodegradable) may have significant toxicity and high genotoxicity. Genotoxicological effects may manifest at different levels, from subcellular structures or enzyme systems, to whole organisms. The unicellular electrophoresis/Comet assay (EC) and micronucleus are sensitive methodologies, available, cheap and applicable to any cell type to measure DNA strand breaks in individual cells considered as assays indicative of premutagenic lesions. The evaluation of abnormal cells was performed in producers using treated wastewater for agricultural irrigation. The presence of nuclear and micronuclei abnormalities in the identified cells was classified in relation to their nuclear form by observing degenerative nuclear changes related to cellular toxicity. Among the nuclear abnormalities detected in the producers prevail the condensed and binucleated cell nuclei, without observation of more than six micronuclei per thousand cells counted; however, tests on bioindicators (Allium sativum and Vicia faba) will be carried out to confirm genotoxicity levels generated by the compounds present in the wastewater.

Keynote Forum

Korrin Saunders

Cardiff School of Chemistry
United Kingdom

Keynote: Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation for Water Purification
OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Korrin Saunders photo
Biography:

Korrin completed her Masters in Chemistry at Cardiff University, and is currently involved the Centre for Doctoral Training (CDT) program in Catalysis at Cardiff University, University of Bristol and the University of Bath. As part of the CDT, she has obtained a Masters in Research and is currently in her final year of her PhD. Her PhD works within the Cardiff Catalysis Institute and the school of Chemical Engineering at the University of Bath.

Abstract:

The generation of hazardous waste waters from a variety of industrial processes poses a serious environmental threat. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) is a growing economical and environmentally friendly process for the removal of toxic organic compounds found in such wastewater streams. Using a continuous 3-phase trickle bed reactor, this project focuses on the complete oxidation of phenol as model organic pollutant. Of the catalysts screened, platinum/ silicon carbide proved the most successful, in terms of activity. An explanation is proposed for the increased reaction rates seen when using hydrophobic catalyst supports such as SiC; the presence of a ‘surface gas envelope’ on hydrophobic supports allows for a secondary mass transfer route of oxygen from the gas phase to the catalyst surface, prohibited by more common hydrophilic catalysts.

Investigations were carried out to further optimize the silicon carbide catalysts, and improve mass transfer limitations, with the overall aim of reducing the high energy requirements associated with CWAO, and thus the overall cost and environmental impact.



 

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Antonio Rivera Tapia photo
Biography:

Rivera-Tapia Antonio completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla; obtaining his doctorate in Environmental Sciences in 2009, he began working at the same university from 1997 to date. He currently directs master's and doctoral theses in the areas of environmental science and technology. His research areas focus on environmental problems and microbiological tests. He has published more than 10 articles related to the topic of wastewater characterization within the city of Puebla; and participated in more than 15 national and international congresses on topics focused on the area of environmental sciences.

Abstract:

Water pollution is an environmental problem, the waters are accompanied by organic matter, nutrients and trace amounts of metals. The physicochemical treatments allow partial removal of the organic load, however the costs are high, therefore it is advisable the use of other processes as the biologic. Contaminated rivers represent an interesting source of microorganisms capable of degrading different substrates, considering candidates for isolation and purification processes used in contaminated water. The strategy of bioremediation technologies is the use of different metabolic pathways and increased degradation of native processes to eliminate or reduced the contaminating substances. The isolates were monitored in medium with different substrates (carbohydrates, proteins and glycerol). Nineteen bacterial isolates from the three monitored water bodies were obtained, the percentage of capacity to assimilate strains with different carbohydrates varied depending on the compound, 100% of the strains degraded dextrose and sucrose, degraded 86% starch, 66% casein and none of the isolates showed hydrolysis of gelatin and lipase production. Results are in close relation to the place of done these bacteria were isolated; as different levels of contamination may influence the bacteria present characteristics to adapt to the use of a wide range of carbohydrates. Although the degradation of pollutants in nature is often the result of the activity of a microbial consortium rather than a single organism, the potential degrader consortium depends on the potential that microorganisms present individually in their interaction with specific pollutants, for this reason have isolated autochthonous capacity to remove organic matter is a pathway for future use.

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Laila Al-Qarni photo
Biography:

Laila Alqarni, she received her Master degree in chemistry from Saudi Arabia at King Abdul Aziz university in 2009. She started her job in 2008 as Teaching Assistant , then she got her promotion to lecturer in 2009 . She has attended at New Jearsy institute of technology since 2015 .she will receive her PhD in Physical chemistry from New Jersey institute of technology under the direction of Prof. Zafar Iqbal where she used Raman spectroscopy for detection glucose at very low concentration (pharmaceutical and biofuel sensing application).         
 

Abstract:

The small normal Raman cross-section of glucose is considered a major issue for their detection by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for medical applications, such as blood glucose level monitoring of diabetic patients and evaluation of patients with other medical conditions since glucose is a marker for many human diseases. Similarly, organic contaminants such as toluene suspended in drinking water require detection and removal. In this work, we report the use of commercial multilayer graphene sheets as substrates on which gold nanoparticles are chemically assembled by citrate reduction. The results show that these substrates are capable of providing SERS enhancement factors up to 1010 with a detection limit to 10-8 M in aqueous solutions of glucose. The SERS performance on graphene substrates are many orders of magnitude higher compared with results on gold coated chemically etched Klarite® silicon substrates. The glucose spectra over a wide range of concentrations in the 400-1500 cm-1 fingerprint region were recorded with a Thermo Scientific DXR Raman microspectrometer using 785 nm laser wavelength, 10 mW laser power and a 50x microscope objective. The intensity of the 1340 cm-1 line of glucose in particular varied linearly with glucose concentration and can be used as a calibration for samples of unknown concentrations. Chemometric methods were used to provide improved spectra at very low concentrations. The role of fractional charge transfer effects from the graphene substrate to glucose that could provide secondary enhancement of the spectra will also be evaluated [1]. Similar preliminary results on toluene suspended in water related to water contamination will also be presented.
 

Keynote Forum

Madihah Humoud

New Jersey Institute of Technology
USA

Keynote: Control Fouling In membrane distillation
OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Madihah Humoud photo
Biography:

Abstract:

 

               Membrane distillation (MD) is a technology that designed to remove the salt particles, minerals and other contaminants from sea, brackish or wastewater to produce pure water. The process exhibits higher than 99% salt rejection from the brine water. However, like other membrane processes, membrane fouling is one of the major concern in MD that reduces the performances of the process significantly.

            The primary aim here is to reduce the fouling by using different antiscalants materials. These active antiscalants interact with the fouling materials and helps to prevent and remove the deposition of the salt clusters from the membrane surfaces to maintain a consistent performance. The use of antiscalant materials was observed to be beneficial in maximizing the overall yield and reducing the time of operation.

Keynote Forum

Inyoung Park

Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology
South Korea

Keynote: A Long-Term Aerosol Prediction Model Based on a Bi-Directional Long-Short Term Memory Neural Network
OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Inyoung Park photo
Biography:

Inyoung Park is a Ph.D. student in School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, South Korea. She received a B.S. degree in Computer Application from the Bangalore University in 2015. Her current research focuses on speech signal processing and climate change modeling based on deep neural networks.
 

Abstract:

With increasing of interests in asrosol for national environmental crisis, prevention of aerosol becomes a major issue for human-being health. As the ecosystem vulnerability becomes clear, the need for long-term aerosol prediction has been attracted. Since it is known that the amount of aerosol is highy related to pollutants such as CO, SO2, NO, and so on, the accuracy of long-term aerosol prediction can be increased by exploiting the relation between pollutants and aerosol levels.

Therefore, this paper proposes a long-term aerosol prediction model based on a bi-directional long-short term memory (B-LSTM) network, which is a well-known deep neural network technique applied to time-series data. The proposed model is composed of two layers of the B-LSTM network. The lower layer is designed to predict a pollutant rate for up to 3-hour by using the correlation between pollutants and aerosol. The upper layer of the B-LSTM network is for predicting a PM10 rate up to 24-hours by using the lower layer outputs. Here, the B-LSTM network is trained using actual pollutant data collected on an hourly basis for 30 years (from 1987 to 2016) of 15 different industrial locations of South Korea.

The prediction accuracy of the lower layer of the B-LSTM network achieved 77.4% for 3-hour prediction of pollutants such as CO, SO2, NO. In addition, the prediction accuracy of PM10 from the upper layer of the B-LSTM was evaluated by measuring the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) between actual and predicted. As a result, the RMSE averaged over 15 locations was measured as about 13.77% for 24-hour PM10 prediction.

Keynote Forum

Jiwon Lee

Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology
South Korea

Keynote: A Long-Term Aerosol Prediction Model Based on a Bi-Directional Long-Short Term Memory Neural Network
OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Jiwon Lee photo
Biography:

Abstract:

With increasing of interests in asrosol for national environmental crisis, prevention of aerosol becomes a major issue for human-being health. As the ecosystem vulnerability becomes clear, the need for long-term aerosol prediction has been attracted. Since it is known that the amount of aerosol is highy related to pollutants such as CO, SO2, NO, and so on, the accuracy of long-term aerosol prediction can be increased by exploiting the relation between pollutants and aerosol levels.

Therefore, this paper proposes a long-term aerosol prediction model based on a bi-directional long-short term memory (B-LSTM) network, which is a well-known deep neural network technique applied to time-series data. The proposed model is composed of two layers of the B-LSTM network. The lower layer is designed to predict a pollutant rate for up to 3-hour by using the correlation between pollutants and aerosol. The upper layer of the B-LSTM network is for predicting a PM10 rate up to 24-hours by using the lower layer outputs. Here, the B-LSTM network is trained using actual pollutant data collected on an hourly basis for 30 years (from 1987 to 2016) of 15 different industrial locations of South Korea.

The prediction accuracy of the lower layer of the B-LSTM network achieved 77.4% for 3-hour prediction of pollutants such as CO, SO2, NO. In addition, the prediction accuracy of PM10 from the upper layer of the B-LSTM was evaluated by measuring the root-mean-squared error (RMSE) between actual and predicted. As a result, the RMSE averaged over 15 locations was measured as about 13.77% for 24-hour PM10 prediction.

Keynote Forum

Berenice Ángel Hernández

Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla
Mexico

Keynote: D-TiO2/ZnO-Degradation of contaminants present in residual water using TiO2/ZnO catalysts
OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Berenice Ángel Hernández photo
Biography:

Berenice Ángel is studying her master's degree in Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, México. She has published one paper in a journal of her country and realized a stay of investigation in the PSA, Spain.

Abstract:

Degradation of contaminants present in residual water using TiO2/ZnO catalysts (D-TiO2/ZnO): It is an experimental work which aims to degrade the contaminants present in the water from a municipal wastewater treatment plant. This objective is achieved through the use of UV radiation and TiO2/ZnO catalysts. The catalysts used were synthesized using the sol-gel method. The sol-gel method was chosen for the synthesis because this method achieves a high homogeneity and purity of the materials besides presenting a great thermal stability. once the catalysts were obtained their characterization was carried out by the methods of x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy.

Degradation tests are carried out on the wastewater with the catalysts and a 850 mL batch photoreactor composed of a medium pressure mercury vapor lamp which emits ultraviolet radiation with a region between 200-400 nm. To follow up the photodegradation samples were taken and analyzed in a UV spectrophotometer. Physico-chemical, microbiological and genotoxicity analyzes are carried out before and after photodegradation to compare the results and verify that the degradation has been successful. The results of the tests showed an evident decrease in the color, turbidity, solids, heavy metals, chemical oxygen demand and biological demand of oxygen present in the residual water sample.

 

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Celeste Solís Martínez photo
Biography:

Celeste Solís Martínez finished his studies in the career in food engineering by the Benémerita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla. Currently is a student of master in environmental sciences and is studying the third semester.

Abstract:

The accelerated growth of the population worldwide has led localities to a greater consumption of natural resources. Overpopulation also requires quality improvement. Industrialization, urbanization and daily consumption have limited the availability of water in many parts of the world, so in some populations it is necessary to reuse wastewater that is subject to one or two phases of a treatment process, resulting in water poor quality that generates problems on human health. In addition to the above, the present work studies the capacity of metabolism and absorption of phosphorus, nitrogen and heavy metals present in the waste water of the treatment plant of the state of Puebla using chlorella vulgaris algae. This was carried out by bioassays at different concentrations of residual water (Witness, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%). The test that showed the best characteristics was 100%, this sample was centrifuged to separate the organic matter and later the water was placed in a photoreactor, it was made to react with UV light, hydrogen peroxide and ozone. The content of heavy metals present in the biomass obtained from the bioassay was determined by atomic absorption. To know the quality of the water treated with this type of technology, the acute toxicity was analyzed by Daphnia magna and the anomalies were determined in the cellular mitosis in Allium sativum. It should be mentioned that the general water parameters were measured at the beginning and end of each representative stage for a complete analysis.