Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend International Conference on Industrial Chemistry New Orleans, Louisiana, USA.

Day 2 :

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sujitra Wongkasemjit photo
Biography:

Sujitra Wongkasemjit has completed her PhD from West Virginia University and Post-doctoral studies from Food and Drug Administration, USA. She is a Professor of Petroleum and Petrochemical College, Chulalongkorn University. She has published more than 100 papers in reputed journals, 7 local patents, 2/3 books/book chapters, and more than 200 international presentations

Abstract:

Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum), Tiger grass (Thysanolaena maxima), Mission grass (Pennisetum polystachyon), Kans grass (Saccharum spontaneum) and Giant reed (Arundo donax) were locally collected to test as bioethanol feedstock. All grasses, showing high cellulose and hemicellulose compositions, were treated by a two-stage microwave/ chemical pretreatment method. The optimum conditions of the pretreatment were investigated and the maximum monomeric sugar yields were compared. The microwave-assisted NaOH and H2SO4 with 15:1 liquid to solid ratio were studied by varying catalyst concentration, temperature, and time to maximize the amount of the obtained monomeric sugar. The maximum monomeric sugars released from microwave-assisted NaOH pretreatment were 5.57 g (at 60C/10 min, 0.5%(w/v) NaOH for Napier grass), 6.45 g (at 140C/15 min, 1%(w/v) NaOH for Tiger grass), 6.56 g (at 120C/10 min, 3%(w/v) NaOH for Mission grass), 6.78 g (at 80C/5 min, 5%(w/v) NaOH for Kans grass), and 6.84 g (at 120C/5 min, 5%(w/v) NaOH for Giant reed) per 100 g biomass, while maximum monomeric sugars from microwave-assisted H2SO4 pretreatment were 42.03 g (at 160C/15 min, 1%(w/v) H2SO4 for Napier grass), 30.37 g (at 200C/5 min, 0.5%(w/v) H2SO4 for Tiger grass), 34.34 g (at 200C/5 min, 1%(w/v) H2SO4 for Mission grass), 33.76 g (at 200C/10 min, 0.5%(w/v) H2SO4 for Kans grass), and 31.91 g (at 180C/30 min, 0.5%(w/v) H2SO4 for Giant reed) per 100 g biomass.

OMICS International Industrial Chemistry 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Masayoshi Tabata photo
Biography:

He has completed his PhD at the age of 28 years from Hokkaido University, Japan and postdoctoral studies from United Kingdom and Sweden. After that he became assistant professor and associated Professors at Hokkaido Univ., and Professor of Muroran Inst. of Tech., Japan. Moreover he also became a senior research director at National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science & Tech. (AIST) Tsukuba, Japan, and Guest Professor at Paris Univ. in France.

Abstract:

The highly stereoregular preparation of mono-substituted polyacetylenes (SPA)s as one of the π-conjugated helical polymers was performed using an [Rh(norbornadiene)Cl]2-triethylamine catalyst. The SPAs are expected as new advanced materials due to semiconductivity, NLO properties, external stimulus responsibility, enantioselectivity, and oxygen permeability. These properties are related to the geometrical structure and higher-order structure of the helical main-chain in the solid phase. Therefore, we have investigated whether the geometrical and helical structures of the SPAs can be controlled through molecular design and/or external stimuli. The p-n-hexyloxyphenylacetylene (pPA) monomer has been stereoregularly polymerized using the Rh catalyst at 25 °C. When ethanol and n-hexane were used as the polymerization solvents, a yellow P(Y), and its red P(R) were obtained, respectively.1 The diffuse reflective UV-vis spectra of these polymers showed max at 445 and 575 nm, respectively. The WAXS patterns of P(Y) and P(R) exhibited hexagonal columnar structures which were attributed to the stretched and contracted helices, respectively. Additionally, P(Y) was irreversibly transformed into a reddish-black P(Y➞B), whose columnar diameter was identical to that of P(R) when heated at 80 °C for1 h. These findings suggest a thermally irreversible rearrangement from a thermally unstable P(Y) with a stretched helix to a stable P(Y➞B) with a contracted helix